Tag Archive | blanching vegetables

Too Many Tomatoes

Today, we had to process what is left of our tomatoes. They were one day away from the compost due to being in the house in pails on the floor for too long. This was a result of having planted too many plants in the garden and having a spectacular growing year. We had the hot day, almost hot nights and LOTS of rain.

We peeled and boiled down the tomatoes, so that they simply don’t take up as much space in the freezer. We decided not to can anymore because we already have 60 quarts canned and put away. The freezers are also loaded with many other vegetables, but can probably fit a few more jars.

pans

When they are done we attempt to clean the juice off the stove. ; -)

Sometimes we add salt, garlic and basil and sometimes we don’t. It is a good idea to mark the jars with what is in the mixture so that no more salt is added by accident when heating it up or using it in something else like chili or soup. I’ve made that mistake several times, and have even put salt in saurkraut soup by accident! Silly me.

There are a few pails of tomatoes, some Roma and some regular, left on the kitchen floor, but we intend to put those in the fridge and eat them fresh.

Harvest Lessons Learned

This year as usual, there were many things in our garden that did well. We also had a major failure. This is the pattern that most gardeners find every year. Some things do well and some don’t.

Garlic crop failure

This year we had a major failure of garlic. When we asked around, almost everyone in our area did too, except one person. That person had mulched her garlic with straw the fall before. Last winter had very little snow cover and most of the garlic seed rotted in the ground. We ended up with only 150 cloves to plant for next year, and now we have to start all over again to produce for garlic sales.

The year of the pepper

On the good side, it was the year for pepper. Hot days and nights with a lot of rain. We used peppers houses on half of the plants, but near the end of the summer the peppers that were not under the huts caught up to the covered ones and ended up being as productive.
peppers

Lots of everything else

All other vegetables did pretty well. We are even waiting on Brussels Sprouts which we have never had any luck with, but have already put away 2 ice cream pails of them. Tomatoes we unbelievable, again due to warm nights and lots of rain. We actually are having to give some away as they ripen because we have no more room in the freezer, and already have 50 large canning jars put away.

bs

Every year I try to save Coriander seeds to dry and crush instead of buying the spice from the store. Every year I have to watch carefully so that I don’t pick them too late. Many of the seeds will have white mould on them which I will not use. I also dry basil and oregano. The screen shown below is what I use to dry the leaves. it is an old window screen. Simple but effective.

veggiecounter

Horseradish really speads

Ernie removed and harvest one of the horseradish plants. There were three and we didn’t realize how fast they spread – or how they spread. When he dug the plant up, it was easy to see how the roots go underground kind of like poplar trees. New plants grow from the long underground roots. We gave some away and kept some.

horseradish

Apple-crab jelly

And finally tonight we used what was left of the apple-crabs and made a small amount of jelly. It turned out amazingly clear. Have yet to taste it.

jelly

Happy Fall Harvest!

First harvest 2014

This spring we have harvested our first vegetable – spinach. It seeds itself and we pick it early. Whatever we don’t eat we blanch and freeze for the winter. This year’s spinach harvest was not bad. The amount we get depends where it seeds itself and how much Ernie tills up.

firstharvest

More Harvest!

How important is it to be able to grow your own food? HMMM. Or should I say  MMMMMM…..

The heat this year has brought us plenty of the above vegetables. These we eat right away or put away for the winter. Blanching  is occurring below. We are usually able to grow enough vegetables to last the entire winter. This would be post harvest – different for each vegetable – to the end of the following spring – about Mid-June. This year we still have carrots left and some beans.

The most important vegetable that we save is small onions or what some may call pickling onions. I will discuss this in the next post.