Tag Archive | garlic harvest

Garlic – Our Most Important Garden Plant

Two years ago, we had an almost complete garlic crop failure. At the time, we had been selling some and building up the seed so we could have even more to sell. This also happened to many other people including local garlic growers and organic vegetable farmers, although they were not almost wiped out as we were.

All that disappeared in one winter. The cause: very little snow cover.

Not only did the garlic suffer but most of the plants that usually seed themselves also did not come back. We usually had volunteer spinach – a lot of it – and it all died out. Even the dill and cilantro was reduced in numbers.

But the most severe effect was on the garlic.

This year we have a nice patch growing but there will be little if any for sale. Last year we did have some that we made garlic powder from in our homemade dehydrator. That can go a long way but you always need fresh garlic. What extra we will have is already sold to the first people who asked in the spring this year.

If they miss out, it will be first come first serve.

Most of this year’s crop will go to seed for next year.

 

I was also able to find some of the small garlic “seeds” among the cloves which I planted in a herb bed. They’re doing amazing and should give us some second year bulbs. There are about 20 or so plants. I had TWO second year garlic bulb which I put in another herb bed and both came up.

This is the first time I have followed our garden plants this closely, so I should be able to keep track a bit better what we have.

The most important thing when planting garlic for yourself (which I encourage EVERYONE to do) is buy good seed and plant in the fall. Many people have called us over the years to ask why their garlic didn’t amount to anything. There are two reasons.

ONE: They are buying garlic from the grocery store to use for seed.

Garlic from the store may be treated with something to prevent germination. If it is not, it is still not appropriate to plant because it is not acclimatized to where you are planting.

TWO: They’re planting the seed in the spring.

This does not give the garlic enough time to come up and produce really good heads. They need that early start, especially in continental climates that have cold winters.

So aside from all the garlic troubles of the past, the garlic that we have is doing well and we are on the way to our goal of restocking our seed garlic and having enough to sell.

We were able to harvest and sell some of the garlic scapes from these plants, which were very nice, and I put the rest of them away for ourselves for the winter. I use them in soups, stews and sauces, omelettes. Just about anything really.

harvestyourown

This August we will purchase new seed of a variety that is known to the seller. When I purchased the seed for what we have now, I neglected to ask what the name was, so it is just large purple garlic.

I can’t imagine what it would be like to have absolutely NO garlic at all for a year. I don’t and won’t buy from the store unless I know it it local, so hopefully this problem won’t happen again.

Garlic is our most important garden plant.

 

OK, More About Garlic

Today we will be pulling the last of the garlic. This year we lost some to root maggots which is not usual here. The pics below show what is left of the garlic still in the garden.

We made a drying tray for onions both (regular and multiplier) out of old fridge grates and scrap wood. If you want it to look fancy paint it in a couple of bright colors that match your yard.

We mostly rely on the multiplier onions which outlast, are better and stronger tasting than normal yellow or white onions, and have no bugs. Our seed for this is previous years onion bulbs which have been passed down in my husband’s family for generations.

Multiplier onions have a much stronger taste of onion so you need fewer for the same strength of taste. These plants grow anywhere, and look nice doing it. 

To the right are last falls multipliers. Slightly dried out but still edible and can still be planted one year later. These onions are almost indestructible, and tasty! Below are the multipliers in the ground.

Next, garlic.

After harvest we tie them in bundles and hang them in our lean-to open at both ends if it is not a rainy day for air circulation. As you can see, you do not need a fancy setup to grow your own food.