Tag Archive | garlic taste test

Garlic Taste Testing

I have expressed it before – garlic is our most important and possibly most valuable garden plant. The reason for this are the health benefits and the flavour it provides to meals and the ability to sell our excess at decent good return.

Over the years of garlic production we have become proficient at growing it, using it and in making garlic powder. We have had almost complete harvest failures and amazing production.

We even have our own DIY Dehydrator which works amazing well and we have used it for several years.

 

 

The Taste Test

This year we planted four different cultivars – Tibetan, Siberian, Marino, and Russian Red. The first three were adapted to our area (prairie adapted) and the Russian garlic was obtained from a different province that is normally much warmer than ours. Guess what the growing results were.

The three prairie adapted cultivars were fabulous producers. Not super large bulbs but consistent in the number of cloves and in size and colour.  Most of the Russian garlic ended up wormy and rotting. This then, was the first type we made into powder since they would not last much longer.

We kept a few cloves of the Russian cultivar and did a raw garlic taste test to determine hotness and other flavour qualities.

To evaluate flavour we had to use something to act as what I call a hotness disperser – bread and butter – to prevent the garlic from burning the mouth and throat too much. Toast could also be used here.

I repeated the taste test twice, trying one cultivar (one whole clove) per day, twice. I used the same kind of bread and butter and ate the whole clove on one side of the bread so that I had the rest of the bread to absorb the hotness if needed.

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Siberian                               Marino                                 Tibetan

RESULTS

We had interesting results.

The cultivars we naturally thought would be hotter were the Tibetan and Siberian, and naturally the Marino should be less hot, simply based on the names. The Russian garlic turned out to have a decent amount of hotness and residual burning after finishing, likely due to its larger size and higher moisture content (I really have no idea, I’m just guessing here)

The hottest and best tasting garlic for me was THE MARINO!  I had read somewhere on the internet that if you can grow only one garlic, grow Marino. Maybe this had influenced my tastebuds and therefore my decision? I really have no idea.

The Marino was hottest on the first bite and had lingering hotness throughout the tasting. The Siberian and Tibetan both were not super hot at first taste, then got a bit hotter and then decreased in temp right after that. By the end of all the taste tests, no cultivar had residual burning that I have experienced with the Russian garlic in other years.

I am going to attribute the garlic hotness or lack of it to growing conditions. We had a very dry year, but all the garlic seemed less hot to me. I guess it could also be me used to eating raw garlic?

So the hotness was the main concern in this taste test. If there are other ways to test garlic flavour I do not know them. So for now, the differences in hotness is what we have determined about the garlic we grow, and can relate that information to customers.

If you can stand it, try a garlic taste test yourself. I would like to compare to grocery store garlic sometime!

Happy garlic eating!