Tag Archive | Homesteading Arts

Freezing In-Season Fruit

At this time of year to save some money, we buy fruit, which is sometimes on sale, wash and freeze it for the winter. We do this instead of buying frozen from the grocery store in the winter. By doing this we know exactly where the fruit is grown and how it was processed (by us).

We do this with blueberries, Saskatoon berries (otherwise known as serviceberries) and sometimes strawberries if we can get them locally. To freeze them we use plastic honey containers as you can see in the photos. We feel this packaging method is acceptable since the berries do not contact too much of the plastic. Not as much as the honey that originally comes in them anyway.

This is what we are currently doing on the homestead right now as boring as it may seem.

blueberries

We usually buy about two dozen packages of blueberries and about the same in strawberries. The Saskatoons have to be picked, which we do locally. And then we stuff ourselves with fresh berries for a few days! That’s it!

Rural Business Promotion – On or Offline?

Living rurally is definitely different from living in urban areas for many reasons. When thinking about promoting your small business, there are a few things that are important to consider as being challenges and benefits.

Advertising In An Area Of Low Population

Reliable access to the internet can be one of those annoying differences between rural and urban areas that put a damper on promoting a business to your ideal customer. Luckily, depending on what area you live in, it might not matter that much. Promoting to the locals is often best done by using paper advertising.

As a social media manager for rural small business, I don’t always advocate for my own services. It all depends on the area you live in and why people are coming into your town.

Non-Paid Advertising

In very small communities, posters on bulletin boards are still used to notify locals of what is going on – even with the younger crowd. Word of mouth is quite a good promotional tactic for small, service based businesses such as electricians or carpenters. Often, many businesses don’t even really have to advertise at all.

Where we live, only the larger businesses such as contractors and hotels do much paid advertising in the local newspaper or online. Everyone else relies on non-paid advertising. There are many people working on their own as sole proprietors who just get to know people in the area and get more than enough work from that. So actually, their best advertising tactic is in-person sales of their service and word of mouth.

This is the old 45 highway

Digital Advertising

In our village, which is a tourist town, most businesses can use social media to their benefit because the majority of sales is done during the spring/summer and weekends when cottagers and tourist come in. These tourists come in from up to 4 hours away and have access to good internet services. So they can find out whats going on here by using the internet as long as a business is using it properly.

Many organizations here still use only posters pinned to bulletin boards simply because they have not realized the benefits available to them in using digital advertising. They also spend money on advertising in the local newspaper, which is useful to a degree but limited as well to the older newspaper readers. The younger groups are not reading the newspaper with as much regularity. This poses a problem for some of these organizations, who are also made up of locals who in our area are all older residents of the village.

What is Appropriate?

Each town or village will need to determine on its own what is the most appropriate and cost effective means of advertising or promotion for them. Since most social media is free it cannot hurt to have a presence there. However, the thing about social media is just that – it is social and needs to be updated with regularity. The cost of using social media if you do not have the ability to post regularly is mostly in paying someone to do it for you. This can be a problem for communities that are not really going to benefit from using it, as it can be costly to pay someone to be a manager.

If a sole proprietor or volunteer of an organization can do the work well her/himself, then it won’t hurt. But not updating your social media often – at least twice a week – will not do you any favours in increasing your credibility.

 

It is impossible to know whether or not internet service will actually improve in rural areas or not. Some places may improve while other may not. This is also something to take into account when working on a marketing plan or deciding whether or not to actually do the extra work to post online.

Either way rural businesses are not going anywhere anytime soon. It’s just a matter of figuring out what is the best thing for you and your rural small business.

Shed

Shed in field with tarp roof

Plywood Bathroom Sink Stand

Our bathroom has been in pieces for 2 years. It has taken us that long to dismantle, design, choose, and buy the stuff we needed to finish the project.

Actually, I am not really complaining. Our favourite thing when doing a project is to do it slowly. And that we did. We did that because we didn’t want to make any mistakes.

In the picture below, Ernie is varnishing the sink stand. He made it out of Maple plywood. We stained it with dark stain and then varnished it with water soluble varnish.

IMG_4094

The next picture is the bathroom mostly done. The sink was purchased at a hardware store and was really the only choice we had and it was in stock in the store. If we had to do it again, I would either order one that we knew was eco-friendly – if such a thing exists, or we would make our own out of something recycled. The plumbing is not done in the picture, that is why there is a rag hanging out of the wall. Obviously the sink tap is not cheap. We have found that often you get what you pay for so we spent some money on that.

The ceramic wall tiles were left overs at the store and they had enough for this surround. Ernie bought pine panelling for the wall behind the sink and a small section on the other end of the bathtub. This will be varnished with the water-soluble varnish as well. Just as an aside, the mirror in the picture was salvaged and Ernie made the frame from scrap wood. I varnished it.

IMG_4127

So from a homesteading perspective, I feel we did the best we could on the recycling/reusing side and the not spending too much side. Ernie did all the work himself and did it at a relaxed pace, not stressing himself out at all. It took several weeks but was worth the wait.

Home-based Business Work Burnout

I am currently experiencing extreme burnout at work. So much so that I have to stop working and shut down my business. My job and business –  grooming, training and boarding dogs, has for years ( 9 years) made it so that there is no time away from dogs. I work from home and I have my own dogs here as well as other people’s as part of the business. The whole thing was part of my plan to be an urban homesteader: working from home at something I love to help support the homestead lifestyle.

mirandabath

Most people enjoy going home from work to be away from work. For me, there is no such thing. When I board dogs, the dogs live here with us so I am on edge 24 hours a day thinking about the boarding dogs.

Don’t get me wrong here, I appreciate being able to even HAVE a job that I can do at home and not have to commute. I know there are people who don’t have jobs. However, in my enthusiasm to work from home, I picked a career that was too similar to my home life and therefore had no separation.

Because we live in a lowly populated area, I am forced to take most if not all clients at the risk of not making enough money that year or losing clients. Sometimes there is overlap of clients so that I don’t have any days off for weeks and weeks. We can’t go anywhere or really do anything as there is always someone’s dog to consider, even if it is just one dog staying with us.

As a business owner, I also am in charge of promotion of the business in real life, and on social media. As well, I took on some extra work as a social media manager for several other businesses. These were not pet businesses, but added to the workload.

I discussed this with Ernie, and we both agree that the burnout is in part because of the long hours and no breaks, but I also believe that at some point my heart was not really into it. I feel that I may have been pursuing the pet professional business because I had something to prove. This, however, is a subject for a completely different post so I won’t elaborate here.

My burnout is so extreme, that I have even stopped going to dog shows which I used to enjoy, training my own dogs, and have completely changed my hobby interests. I am now painting.

winterscene

Strangely, I am OK with all this, especially the painting part. Yes, I am a beginner, but this is something that I am using to relax my mind as I recover from the burnout and is purely for the love of the process. I don’t care if it ever gets me anywhere. It is FUN.

So, I am a little depressed and sad about closing down my business that I have pursued for so many years, and leaving behind the clients that I enjoyed meeting and interacting with. But I think that I will be able to do more in another area of work when I find it because I learned what I did wrong with the previous one.

Happy Homesteading!