Tag Archive | Salvage

The Greenhouse Is Done – But You Don’t Really Need One

Our greenhouse is finished. Well, except for painting the trim. The plants that have been in there so far this summer are growing somewhat faster than those outside, but I feel this is likely due to transplant shock of those that were put out.

As I have said before this greenhouse was built with mostly scrap/recycled/savaged materials with the exception of a few pieces of wood and the roof plastic. Even the vinyl siding was salvaged from the dump.

It is functional, not bad looking and seems to be working well.

As for the plants that are growing inside, they are also doing quite well. We have tomatoes, peppers, and herbs in there as well as outside on the patio.

This is all really an experiment for me. I wanted to try to grow vegetables in pots, in and outside of the greenhouse, to see if and how easily it could be done here in our climate.

What I have found is that it is easy to grow your own food in pots on balconies or outside on your patio. The easiest things I have found to grow are herbs, onions, obviously tomatoes, peppers, kale… well everything really.

I even have corn growing in two pots just to see if it would work. And yes it works.

corn

Recently, several people have complained to me about the increased prices at the grocery store, particularly vegetables. Of the people who complained to me, some lived in the city and some lived in rural areas.

I can understand that there will be certain places in urban areas in which it will be difficult to have any kind of outdoor space for plants. But everyone has an indoor place for one plant.

So there is really no excuse not to do this except that you are completely set against doing it.

Why should I grow my own food? Isn’t it time consuming?

My answer to this is, no. But it IS a lifestyle. My opinion ( if it matters) is that everyone should learn how to grow SOMETHING of their own, even if it is just flowers or houseplants. I believe tending to garden, even a small one, is an important part of being human. But you don’t have to start out growing everything at once. And of course if you don’t want to that is your choice. Just don’t complain to me about the price of food.

When you learn how to grow even the most simple and small amounts of food for yourself, you are connecting to nature, you can control where some of your food comes from and you learn something new every time you plant something. This last point is the most important one of the three in my mind.

What to grow

Growing your own herbs is the best way I have found to start growing food. You can grow all of the oregano, basil, coriander, parsley and dill you need for a whole year in pots in a small space. Parsley can grow inside all winter in a sunny window, and early in the year you can start coriander (cilantro), dill and even small onions in pots to pinch for fresh flavour in your cooking.

Multiplier onions can provide green onions before they mature AND just the greens if you want. If you leave them to mature, the bulbs can be saved and planted at another time. There is really no way to make a mistake in planting them.

Other really useful plants to plant in pots are tomatoes and peppers. They take a little more attention, especially pruning for the tomatoes but nothing that can’t be handled.

Tomatoes never have to go bad because if you grow too many because you can freeze them whole and use them anytime during the non-growing season.

Anyway, I’m not getting rid of my greenhouse just because I don’t need it. I love it and will use it to start the large amount of veggies we need each year.

But it is time for people to take matters into their own hands and start growing some of their own food if only just to eat something amazing.

Just start.

onioninpot

Multiplier onion growing in a reused plastic “pot”.

Reusing Junk – A Homemade Camera Accessory

This past summer, we found a small camera tripod at a thrift store. It was in great shape and was $10. Ernie bought it as soon as he saw it.  The only thing missing was the part that attached the camera to the tripod.

tripod1

Yes, I know this is a crucial part of the whole thing, but the solution was pretty easy to figure out.

All that was needed was a thick piece of plastic attached to the base of the camera. The plastic part had to fit into the top of the tripod and hold tight inside the clip.

Ernie found a piece of thick plastic from an old tripod and matched the size and shape to the opening of the camera holder on the tripod. He did this by filing it down with a regular hand file and a small hack saw.

He then used a short wide screw to attach it to the bottom of the camera, which has the standard attachment point like all cameras.

tripod2

As you can see, its not perfect. But it works and it is not noticeable from the top.

tripod3

Anytime you have a chance to pick up something that is possibly missing a part, consider how much you will save compared to how much time you have to put into making the missing part. Often you will find that it won’t take long and could save you a bunch of time and money.

Salvaged Hardwood Becomes Bed Frame

IMG_1583We don’t have a bed frame. Our bed sits on the floor and has for almost 8 years. A few weeks ago my hubby’s sister got rid of her waterbed and didn’t want the wood frame. We took took it and now it will be made into our new bed frame after it has been dissected and put back together. Nothing like a beautiful free hardwood bed frame even if you do have to put in sweat equity.