Tag Archive | self-sufficiency

Eating Well On Little Money Part 2

Over a year ago, I did an experiment of sorts in my kitchen. Using the local Co-op weekly sales flyer, I chose food items up to $10 per day to see if a family of two could feed itself well on that amount.

The problem I have found is that eating “well” is a subjective term. Some people think that eating well means eating at restaurants or buying as much convenience food as they want. OR it could mean a certain quality or price of food.

All this is just avoiding learning how to eat well for less. It can be done.

To remind ourselves from the last post: The daily food purchases for Day One and Day Two are as follows:

Day 1: Eggs, Butter, Pasta (made from white flour, not great but that is what we used for now), Salt.

From this you could eat for the day and if you did have some condiments such as ketchup or left over from previous purchases of food you could use those to spruce things up.

At our food store, this all cost $9.54 cents. At other stores you could get it for less, I’m sure, but that is not part of the project.

The point is use what is available.

The belief is often that you can’t eat well and cheap, locally.

Day 2: Carrots, Banana, Potatoes, Onion, Barley. Cost: $10.00

With the ingredients from these two days, I made a vegetable soup that was unbelievably good.

So now you have pasta and soup with some fruit.

We figured out that our soup cost us 38 cents a serving while a store brand, canned, cream of mushroom soup cost about 24 cents. However, the nutritional content of the canned soup is clearly lower. Eating this canned food is NOT what I would call eating well.

I expect that some people don’t know how to make soup from scratch, and therefore think that they have to buy canned and therefore can’t eat well.

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The key to eating this way is to learn how to cook. It’s as simple as that, or as difficult.

Cooking for oneself takes time and effort, just like anything else worthwhile.  Our society has moved away from that. The focus is on ready made, packaged foods. You get addicted to these. They are part of the disconnect between how people work and how people live. They are easy and simple – and not nourishing.

I am not saying this to point the finger of blame at anyone or of how people live, just a statement of fact. My goal is to educate people to see that it is not as difficult as they might believe and to encourage a bit more food security into their lives – learning how to prepare their own food. That is the whole point of this blog.

Many people go to jobs daily that suck the life out of them. They are then exhausted and don’t have the energy to prepare good food for themselves. There is a different way.

This happened to Ernie during his working life in the big city. Work was from 7 am to 3 pm. Luckily his commute was only about 20 mins each way, but at the end of the work day he would go home and sleep for an hour before eating a meal or two hours after the meal. When he changed his life from working at this job, his food selections changed as well.

Working at something you don’t feel good about or are not connected with depletes your energy just like eating crappy food. I know, I’ve done both.

If you feel defensive when reading this post you may not be secure in your food or other choices. Please don’t post a negative comment. The intention is not to try and insult you (I am not that much in control of your thinking anyway ;-).

There are people who need help and it is to those people that this post is directed. Thanks you.

I will continue this experiment as planned and post the results here shortly – with a few modifications. Day 3 and 4 will be posted on soon.

Small Homesteads Can Be Big Producers

Since our homestead is in a village, we have a restricted amount of space that we homestead on. Obviously it is going to be smaller than most. We have in total about one and 1/4 acres.

Normally one would think that you can’t do much on a small property and I used to believe that too. We have found though, that anything you want can be grown or produced even on a small homestead.  It is similar to what the amazing things you can do with a can of paint for redecorating or how you can live in a tiny house, which we know that many people do.

Below are the things I have come up with that work for us the best when trying produce food on a small homestead.

We make use of all the space we have. This one is clearly the most important and actually includes most  of the ones below. This space includes everything. Cupboard space, yard space, garden space, and any storage space. I guess we could always do better but for the most part, we get creative about storing things.

We don’t buy something if we can make it or do without. Buying things takes storage space. We don’t have storage space. It really is the same as living in a tiny house. You just don’t have room for the extra stuff.

An example of things like this are machines of all kinds. We bought a new riding lawnmower out of necessity and definitely had to have a place to park it indoors. The only shed that it will fit in is off the ground about a foot, so Ernie had to make a ramp – out of scrap wood of course – to drive it into the shed. So now the shed is mostly taken up with this lawn mower and to put up another shed will take space away from the garden so there is basically no more room for any new machinery. Luckily we don’t need a tractor, yet. Anyway I think you get the idea. We have no room for boats, cars, or fun toys etc. We do without those.

We only plant what we know we will eat. This way food will not go to waste and the space won’t be taken up by something we don’t need and put to good use growing what we do need.raspberries

We grow some of our vegetables upwards.  Cucumbers and peas are planted on vertical fencing or lines to have them grow upwards. We also are fussy about pinching the tomatoes – taking the sprouts out of the branches so that the plants grow more upwards and don’t sprawl all over the place. This all saves space in the garden.

We make changes if something doesn’t work out the way we thought it would. If we do have something on the homestead that we thought we would like or might be useful but it turned out not being needed or not working out, we change it as soon as possible.

For example, we bought a gooseberry bush several years ago and put it in the back yard. Unfortunately, the dogs were also in the back yard often and would run into it regularly. Luckily no one was injured as they have thick coats. They would also EAT the berries before we had a chance to pick them. So we moved the bush to a totally different location and now it is growing well and producing so that we can use the berries.

So, producing big on a small homestead is mostly about creative use of space. If we had livestock, we would still be able to house them and feed them with what we have now. We would just keep it to the scale that is appropriate for the size of the property.  I have said it before that homesteaders are pros at adapting to new environments. I also believe we are pros are being creative with what we have.

Happy Homesteading!

 

Freezing In-Season Fruit

At this time of year to save some money, we buy fruit, which is sometimes on sale, wash and freeze it for the winter. We do this instead of buying frozen from the grocery store in the winter. By doing this we know exactly where the fruit is grown and how it was processed (by us).

We do this with blueberries, Saskatoon berries (otherwise known as serviceberries) and sometimes strawberries if we can get them locally. To freeze them we use plastic honey containers as you can see in the photos. We feel this packaging method is acceptable since the berries do not contact too much of the plastic. Not as much as the honey that originally comes in them anyway.

This is what we are currently doing on the homestead right now as boring as it may seem.

blueberries

We usually buy about two dozen packages of blueberries and about the same in strawberries. The Saskatoons have to be picked, which we do locally. And then we stuff ourselves with fresh berries for a few days! That’s it!

The Garden So Far

I know it is probably a boring post to make but I am showing off our garden this year. We were’t sure if there would be much of one, since we weren’t going to be planting as much, but it looks like the garden is doing what gardens do – GROW.

Firstly the cucumbers we plant are a heirloom variety, although we don’t have a name for them since they came over at the beginning of the 20th century with the settlers from Ukraine. Ernie used field fencing and salvaged metal poles from the dump this year for them to climb on.

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Then the corn and onions look pretty good too. We’ve had quite a bit a rain this year and everything is so green. Corn is not usually this large at this time of year here simply because of the lack of heat. But hopefully we will have an amazing crop.

 

Umm, well you know about horseradish. This is one of those plants that is not used very often but grows like crazy just to make a point. Beautiful though. And shading some volunteer garlic that doesn’t seem to care.

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And finally the whole garden which looks amazing because of Ernie’s obsession with weeding. Thanks goodness!

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There you have it!

Too Many Potatoes

I can’t believe it but we actually have too many potatoes. We never have too many. But this year Ernie says that if we don’t use them soon or give some away we will have to waste them. He has already planted as many as we can room for in our garden so what ever is left must be eaten.

So, we are making potato dumplings otherwise known as perohy in Ukrainian or perogies in Polish. I’m sure most of you have heard about these. They are a carbohydrate lovers dream. Mashed potatoes with onion sometimes with cheese, mixed in or just plain cottage cheese, saurkraut, or prunes, put inside a white flour dough, boiled and then either fried with more onions or just eaten boiled with sour cream.

When we make them we just have a potato and onion filling. Nothing fancy.

This food is really just a way the homesteaders and pioneers used up fproduce so that it didn’t go to waste. So even though they taste amazing, they are traditional and useful.

The recipe is fairly simple. The dough is flour, water, and oil. The filling is really whatever you darn well feel like filling it with. Cut out dough circles, put in a dab of filling and PINCH closed.

It really couldn’t be more simple. But you can screw them up. If you don’t pinch them right, and add the right amount of flour, they will fall apart in the water as they are boiling. If you make the dough too thick, you will have huge perogies. If your dough is not stretchy enough you will have trouble with everything.

But even though there may be a failure in the procedure, everything is still edible. That is the beauty of this food. At worst you will end up with half moon pasta pieces. Delicious.

Again it seems like us homesteaders are focusing on food.

How We Feed Our Homestead Dogs

Pets are an expense. Food and vet bills are the main issues. When I consider feeding my dogs on the homestead, I always feed the best food I can find. This doesn’t always mean bought food either.

Dogs need to eat well just like we do. What they eat affects their health. Having six dogs and many more over the years and being a pet professional, I have tried all kinds of store bought dog foods as well as those I prepared myself and I have seen many different kinds being fed to their dogs by clients.

On the homestead, the more food I can provide for my dog the better.

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The dogs are waiting to find out what daddy is making.

This is what we do:

We Feed Dry Dog Food

We buy the best quality dry dog food we can find that is made in the closest location to us. Yes, we use a dry dog food for convenience. Yikes! Isn’t this the opposite of a homesteader’s thinking? In a way yes and in a way no.

By yes I mean that it is not self sufficient and likely NOT the most ideal thing for a dog. By no I mean that I have always felt that our dogs need to be able to eat from many different sources. Often, I have worked with a dog who has been babied and won’t eat anything but certain types of food. I expose our dogs to many different kinds of foods and this includes a good quality dry food.

So if you are a “purist” and want to and can feed your dog raw or only stuff from your homestead, great. It can be done. I have fed raw in the past for years, but currently don’t have the access to the kind of meat I want to feed to six dogs. Also, two of my dogs are 15 years old and can’t chew bone anymore. They also are starting to not eat, so I give them whatever I can that is tasty enough to interest them AND give them nutrients they need.

We Feed Cooked Fish

We buy canned salmon and sardines, and fish that was caught from the local area lakes. Don’t forget that if you are or want to be a “raw” feeder, canned fish is cooked and so is not raw. All fish caught in local lakes is cooked before feeding to the dogs.

We Feed Scraps

All scraps have to be whole foods i.e. NOT processed meats, foods with additives etc. Our scraps include things liked cooked potato and other veggies, meat scraps like chicken, venison, beef, pork etc. If there is fat, we still feed it but are extremely careful not to feed too much at once.

We also buy dog cookies/treats at this time from the pet store, but that is also for convenience and we buy from companies that are as local as possible with the best ingredients as possible.

We Feed Meat From Local Sources

We get meat locally. The beef is grass fed from nearby ranchers and we get chicken from a woman who raises them herself. We used to get pork from a farmer but have not had any for a few years. Ernie also hunts during the season, and sometimes the dogs get extra deer meat, but we always cook the deer. The deer antlers are also given to the dogs instead of bones to chew. If I feed bones they must always be raw. We only give chicken bones as we have had bad experiences feeding other bone.

If I feed raw meat only on one day, I make sure to always give bone meal if it is beef or feed the chicken with the bones. Feeding raw meat exclusively without bone leads to nutrient imbalance.

Other Stuff

We also feed raw or cooked eggs. If we have farm eggs then we feed raw. If not, then the eggs are cooked. In the fall we have apples from our trees but make sure not to give too many so that they don’t eat too many seeds. Most seeds go right through because they don’t chew them, but just to be cautious we watch how many they eat.

And thats about it really. Basically, we try to keep it simple and not feed processed food from the grocery store. Dry dog food is processed but with the high quality that we buy I am not worried about that. If we come into a regular source of local meat for the dogs, I will start feeding that.

Happy Homesteading!

 

Tiny Weed Garden

This year we decided to fill in our small strawberry patch because the winter was rough on them and most didn’t survive. We didn’t do anything special to fill this in other than let the existing grass work its way into the area. Also working their way into the bare soil were weeds – or what most gardeners would consider weeds.

While watching the grass grow in, I noticed that there was a large clump of clover that was attracting bees. They all looked so happy, so I left it there. Also in the vicinity were some violas and other perennials that had been in the strawberry bed. I left them all.

Suddenly I noticed that the bed was now full of weeds that actually looked pretty good. I added a rock and dug up the soil, pulling out some black medick and a few other things that I considered weeds in this bed. Now I had a small flower bed of mostly weeds.

The picture below is terrible but gives an idea of what it looks like. I like to use this to explain things in life. Not everything that we consider bad is necessarily bad. Maybe we just need to look at it a different way.

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To see the vlog about it go to: http://youtu.be/vO7KPUjednA

It works because I like it and it is insect friendly and dog friendly – if the dogs pee on a few things it doesn’t matter that much!

DIY Handmade Tree Ornaments

The first project for the tree decorations this year are pine and spruce cone “ornaments”. I feel these are appropriate because they are part of a tree (obviously) and they bring the outdoors inside without make much of a mess. They are already dry, don’t fall apart and can be used year after year.

All you need are pine and/or spruce cones, (the ones I have here are Norway spruce), and some thread or if you want to use something fancier, you can use ribbon or glittery gift tying ribbon. I am using sewing thread because it is not too noticeable when hanging on the tree, and also because I will not be spending anything on this project and I don’t have any ribbon I can use.

All you do is tie a piece of thread or ribbon around one of the cone “branches” near the top. Try to make it balanced by placing the thread closer to the centre of the cone. Tie the end into a loop and hang on the tree.

The other ornaments are crocheted snowflakes that my mom made about 30 years ago. They were hidden away in an attic in a relative’s home and we finally found them. They are a little yellowed but look great on the tree.

This is truly an homestead craft project as it costs nothing to make, if you get your cones from your own trees or some that you find.ornamentsupplies

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Use What You Have For Homesteading Style

Today my project is this alpaca/acrylic scarf that I have made in two days from yarn that I bought ages ago but didn’t use. Actually I did use a couple to make scarves, and they turned out to be super warm but not overly dressy.

I made a long wide scarf with large needles so that it could be wrapped and doubled up if necessary for more warmth, but still look dressy or as I like to call it “glam” haha. This scarf is SUPER warm due to the alpaca in the blend. I had four colours, not enough of any one colour to make a sweater so I thought this would substitute. This was just knitting both sides and I used no pattern.

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Use What You Have

We don’t buy anything fancy when it comes to stuff for the yard. IF we do need something, we buy local or North American made. The picture here is of the table we have on the deck. It is made from brown treated 2x4s and set on top of cement blocks that have been at this house for decades – before I was even here.
The flower pot on the table is from the garbage dump. Oops there is a dent in the flower pot…

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