Tag Archive | waste not

Salvaging Bread

On a recent camping trip, a loaf of pre-sliced homemade raisin bread that we brought along ended up being moved back and forth between locations in the vehicle. This happened because we had more food than space to store it in and the bread got kicked out of the cooler. When we started out it was a fresh loaf and when we arrived home with it uneaten, it was in mostly tiny pieces.

I was able to salvage about 3 pathetic slices for breakfast after we got home. My first thought was to toss it, but then I quickly realized it could be made into bread pudding. I have never made or even eaten bread pudding, but have heard many people rave about it. So I used the whole loaf and made some up.

Luckily my husband eats anything, because after tasting it, I decided I am not a fan. This is not to criticize anyone who loves it, for sure. It is just my opinion. What I do love about it is that the bread does not go to waste, which is likely what happens a lot to bread that has become stale in most households. One of our goals in life is to waste nothing and live frugally, and I believe this is where bread pudding originated – from people living frugally and not wanting to waste anything. If the bread had not had raisins in it, I would have likely given it to the dogs over several days mixed in with their regular meals.

The recipe for bread pudding is simple – bread, cream or condensed milk, hot water, butter, salt, vanilla and eggs. You mix the milk and hot water, and pour it over the bread in a bowl. Once it cools to luke warm (so the eggs don’t cook in the bowl), you pour the mixture of eggs, vanilla, melted butter and a bit of salt into it, mix it up and bake at 350 F for 1 hour.

breadpudding

If I didn’t remember the recipe and needed to make this I would just make it to taste using the above ingredients. You don’t even really need vanilla. We used real maple syrup as a topping but anything sweet could work. The recipe called for a runny brown sugar topping but since we don’t have brown sugar in the house, the maple syrup was more than acceptable.

With the syrup, it tasted to me sort of like soggy french toast. This stuff could definitely pass for a breakfast and could be gussied up with more raisins and maybe even walnuts and cinnamon. I think I might have cooked it in a pan that was too high though. It did puff up quite a bit and would have overflowed if the pan had been smaller, but after cooling it shrank considerably. The texture was the part that I found the most unappealing.

I don’t foresee making this again for a very long time, mostly because I hope we don’t destroy bread this way again. If we have any dried out bread that is not in so many crumbs and pieces, I will attempt to make croutons, which I prefer to the sweeter and softer bread pudding.

So to clarify, there is really no need to waste anything, especially food. We go out of our way to use up anything that we haven’t eaten soon enough in different ways, like this bread, and of course we compost everything else that is inedible for us or the dogs. Our dogs really appreciate any real food we can give them that is not spoiled.

UPDATE:

I have tried the pudding once again and doctored it up with walnuts and cream and I can now say that I like it.

pudding

Use What You Have

We don’t buy anything fancy when it comes to stuff for the yard. IF we do need something, we buy local or North American made. The picture here is of the table we have on the deck. It is made from brown treated 2x4s and set on top of cement blocks that have been at this house for decades – before I was even here.
The flower pot on the table is from the garbage dump. Oops there is a dent in the flower pot…

flowerpotontable

Onion Update

Just a quick update on our container onions. Shown below are the onions planted in a plastic container along with some of our onions from our 2013 harvest. This year our large onions are not rotting in our cellar, likely due to the cooler weather he have had all winter. This has never happened before, but it is nice so we will probably have onions until late spring.

onionupdate

Update On The Salvaged Hardwood Bed Frame

The bed frame is finally finished and here it is:

ImageI guess I shouldn’t say Really finished because there is some varnishing to do on the legs and as you can see an adjustment on the slope of the bed. The floor is not perfectly flat. Yes the bedroom is tiny.  More about that in another post

Small Homes – big savings – and more interesting.

We have a small house because it is:

1. less to clean

2. an interesting older building (almost 100 years old) that has been renovated

3. saves us money because we own the house

4. reduces waste because we aren’t tearing it down to build a new one

Our decor is rustic/vintage. I will be discussing this in the next several blog posts.

The most important point here for homesteaders is that they use what they have. We didn’t tear down what we have to build something  new to make it was more stylish or more impressive.

For example, we will start with Imagethe business. I groom, train and board dogs for a living. Most people who do this build new and make it as fancy as they can, usually a modern look. I decided to make the grooming and boarding area in a small section of the garage which is also the workshop. The whole garage is about 12 feet wide and 24 feet long. Because of the small size we have to make use of every but of space in a way that maximizes the storage capacity.

This is the boarding room or “dog room” as we call it. It  is certainly not new, but it really works and instead in of tearing the whole thing down and re-building we are simply making changes with what we have.  Everything that is in this room is made with recycled materials with the exception of the wood that goes Imageup the wall.

 

The cupboards above the kennel were taken from a house I used to own and found a use here. The owner of that house actually MADE those cupboards himself out of plywood several decades ago.

You can see the large green fan on top of the kennels. This is an old fan but works perfectly and you can’t buy fans that are this sturdy that are made in North America anymore.

The sliding glass door that you can see on the far right was also salvaged from a relatives home as it was being thrown out. Works perfectly.

Sure the cement floor has a few divots in it but that is only cosmetic. It does not need to be replaced.

The only thing in this room that is not my favourite and needs some adjustments is the door. This is the only door we could find because the roof is low and the door had to be cut down to fit so a metal door which would be preferable will not fit. We are keeping our eyes open. For now this will do.

Image

More Wooden Stuff

Since we are talking about wooden items, I just wanted to post a picture of these neat trash cans that hubby made from scrap wood.

Cost of materials:  about 25 cents total.

IMG_5428

Make A Nice Bed Frame For Almost Nothing

Here is a way to get your creative juices flowing without spending a lot of money and make something necessary and useful in the process.

This bed was made by my hubby out of 1x6s. We wanted a certain look so we made it instead of travelling to the city and buying a cheap frame made out of particle board. This bed is sturdy and cost $50 in materials.

Even if you don’t do any building you can still figure this out. All you need is a measuring device – ruler, tape etc, wood, screws and screwdriver (you may want to have a drill to pre-drill holes as the wood may crack if you don’t. You can use a hand drill for this), and metal braces the length of the bed to support the mattress. Salvage braces could work well for this as well.

This mattress is old. I don’t recommend getting used mattresses from people you don’t know. Buy new or make your own (that is for another post).

We also added a headboard made out of scraps that we had left over from panelling the stairs. Very economical and sustainable if you get your wood from the right source. You may want to harvest your own from your woodlot if you have one. That would make a nice rustic decor. We will likely do that in the future.

Make Pasta at Home

It is often believed that it costs a lot to eat well. Part of the point of this blog is to prove that this is a myth. Eating well – or eating poorly is a matter of educating yourself on how to do this, not on how much you make.

This brings us to my lesson for today – PASTA.

Real pasta has has TWO ingredients – flour and water. I actually learned this method from a real Italian cook.

Take some water – about 1 cup and add flour until you have a dough. Roll out and cut into pieces or use a hand crank pasta machine if you have one or can find one at a yard sale or auction. The key to making it easily is to use enough flour when you are rolling out the dough so that it does not stick to everything. Then you must shake it off the pasta before you cook it.

Here are our lasagna noodles that we made two days ago.

It takes a little more time to make your pasta but you would do this in lieu of working more at a job away from home rather than IN ADDITION to your job. You always save money by doing things yourself. And the pasta tastes better.

Homesteading Psychology – Being Happy

After reading many blog posts about being frugal, saving money, being happy, how to find your purpose in life (thank you James Altucher), I decided to make a post.

I am happy.  I do not own a cell phone. I do not make a lot of money. I do not live in a big city. I do not have a lot of “things”. My truck is a hand-me-down and works when I need it.

Things do not make us happy. It is our attitudes about “things” that make us happy or miserable.

I have always known that I cannot keep up to the “Jones” as “they” say. I just can’t. I only feel good when I am working for myself at something that I love doing no matter how much I make. When I don’t do this, I become unhappy. Then I get sick.

My husband was born right after WWII. His family was REALLY poor. But he remembers being happy. Happiness is an inside job. And after many years of self help because of trying to find out my life’s purpose, I just let go and let it happen.

Allow what is trying to work its way into your life. Trying too hard, especially if you are not doing what you really want to be doing, will result in stress and unhappiness. Oh, and most if not all of this will get easier to do after 40.

And if you are so kind as to make a comment here, please be nice.

Here are some of the things that I do to make me happy:

Live More Simply – with dogs

There is no doubt about it – living simply and buying less helps protect our world. But at the same time, if we buy less stuff, someone out there, makes less money. Unfortunately, this has to be.

One of the things we do to buy less is to make stuff. That includes things for our dogs. We don’t buy dog cookies, we make them.

I have found that if I MAKE more things for myself, I NEED less money, so I can work less for others and do what feel right to me.

This brings us back to dog cookies.

When you make your own dog cookies (or your own food), you know what goes into them. Don’t get sucked into the “gotta save time” thing so you go to the store and get some quick. The recipe below is tried and true method. If your dog won’t eat them, he probably is eating too much to begin with.IMG_4947

Recipe:

Water from boiled meat

Whole Wheat Flour

Roll out thin and cut into desired sizes/shapes.

Bake at 350F until they are the color you like. Crispy is best.

That’s it.